Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Vegetarian Appreciation Thread!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • wobbling bear
    replied
    Originally posted by Thumper uni View Post
    I have been a lacto veg for approx 20-25 years for health and moral reasons I think if children actually saw a animal being slaughtered they would be horrified that is where there meat came from .
    not necessarily if they were raised in a farm (or went fishing with adults).
    Ok I have to confess: though I never killed a lamb myself I ate live oysters, boiled lobsters and killed trouts. Worse: I played music at bullfights !
    Now the reason I am "flexitarian" is that I really love cooking vegetables and I am not fond of meat (except duck's meat ) but I eat a lot of fish ...
    I would easily turn vegetarian but for pleasure not for moral reasons (I am a bad boy!)

    Leave a comment:


  • Thumper uni
    replied
    I have been a lacto veg for approx 20-25 years for health and moral reasons I think if children actually saw a animal being slaughtered they would be horrified that is where there meat came from .

    Leave a comment:


  • Calimero
    replied
    Well I hope my English won't be too bad, it's not so easy writing about that in a foreign language...

    When I was maybe about 12 years old I started thinking why I do eat meat. But I didn't know how to explain my parents I want to become a vegetarian so I just ate less and less meat. And now I stopped eating meat at all. Maybe for 2 years now. And I don't feel different, it's just normal for me being a vegetarian. I can't imagine eating meat and I think even if I had to eat it, I couldn't. I think I watched too many of those videos about factory farming etc. Maybe I will try to become a vegan when I don't live at my parents' house any longer (I think they wouldn't accept that) I would really love to be but I'm not sure if I can be so consequent...

    I think it's just totally mad to kill for having a nice food. There are some animals who can't live without meat but human beings can live without. But that's not the biggest problem I have with eating meat. I think even worse is how those animals have to live and die. I just can't imagine how humankind can be so cruel. And I think another reason why I'm vegetarian is: If I ate meat, I don't want to make a difference between different animals because killing a horse is not crueler than killing a pig. And I think I just couldn't eat horses or rabbits for example. And I think this is kind of racist: My pets at home live in quite big cages (they can never be big enough and keeping animals as pets isn't fair, too. But I only have animals from the animal shelter --> pets nobody wants to have) but it is ok if pigs or cows are killed for me. That's weird. Same as I can't watch animals being killed. So why should I eat them? Just because I look away the animals don't have to suffer less...
    I hope that's understandable...

    I don't want to persuade anybody to become a vegetarian, but I want people to know how their meat is produced. When they can eat it I'm sure they also can see how it's made...

    Leave a comment:


  • scott ttocs
    replied
    Maestro,

    What a refreshing viewpoint! I will share it with my vegan niece.

    Scott

    Leave a comment:


  • Matt_V
    replied
    Originally posted by uni57 View Post
    ... why did you switch to vegetarianism?
    As I grew up, I started to think about life more and more. I realized that I, just like every other human, didn't choose to be born as a human, just like animals didn't choose to be born as animals. I thought about how unfortunate it would be to have been born as an animal in a factory farm. I began to feel bad about supporting to industry, so I stopped.

    Humans are high on the food chain, and the natural order of things suggests that we eat animals that are beneath us. There is nothing wrong with that, as we wouldn't even be here if life hadn't been eating other life for a long time. But I can survive just fine without killing and eating other living things, so that's what I do. I go on living, and so do they. We both get to continue enjoying life. I would like to eat them, but I don't think that me enjoying a delicious meal is more important than something staying alive.

    Most humans seem very much okay with what goes on in factory farms. I think that this comes down to the fact that we deem ourselves as superior to animals since we are stronger and more intelligent. But there's no reason to think that the animals that we're killing and eating aren't also conscious beings. It is entirely possible for a species much stronger and more intelligent than humans to exist. If that were the case, would it be okay for them to factory farm humans for our body parts?

    Also, becoming an Atheist played a large part in my decision. As a Christian, I was brought up to believe that we were superior to every living thing and had dominion over them.

    Originally posted by uni57 View Post
    ... how much research did you do before switching?
    I did none.

    Originally posted by uni57 View Post
    ... do you feel better on this diet? Or the same?
    I'm approaching 3 months and I feel the exact same. I haven't made any changes to my diet other than cutting out meat.

    Originally posted by uni57 View Post
    ... do you ever miss meat (like bacon)? I know I would.
    I did very badly for the first month and a half or so. Whenever my roommates were frying sausages or bacon I would put my face up to the pan and take a deep breath, enjoying the aroma.

    The cravings seem to be going away now though.

    Leave a comment:


  • wickedbob
    replied
    I was joking Billy, and yes I know, meat is generally unhealthy, so when I can I will get my proteins from vegtables sources, but somedays now I can only get 25carbs, so I need massive protein to for sufficient calories.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillyTheMountain
    replied
    Originally posted by wickedbob View Post
    I'm off, I think.

    Not that I 'need' meat, but I'm starting up a new diet and eating plan that requires loads and loads of protein 275gram + per day. Can't some get them from sources that have carbs either.

    I'm trying to Cut weight, and gain muscle.

    I can be a vegetarian who only eats fish? Ha, I think I really could have done it, not that hard, but my quest for health, which brought be to vegetarianism has taken me else were to a carb cycling macro diet.
    that's a pescatarian, not a vegetarian.

    watch out for mercury and toxins, google it to decide what species you eat.

    Leave a comment:


  • wickedbob
    replied
    I'm off, I think.

    Not that I 'need' meat, but I'm starting up a new diet and eating plan that requires loads and loads of protein 275gram + per day. Can't some get them from sources that have carbs either.

    I'm trying to Cut weight, and gain muscle.

    I can be a vegetarian who only eats fish? Ha, I think I really could have done it, not that hard, but my quest for health, which brought be to vegetarianism has taken me else were to a carb cycling macro diet.

    Leave a comment:


  • BillyTheMountain
    replied
    If they jail people cruelty to dogs, should they also jail for cruelty to cows?

    Animal Equality
    by Joan Dunayer

    When I was writing Animal Equality, a friend questioned the book's title. Did I really mean to say that all animals are equal? Yes, I did. Like human equality, animal equality doesn't mean equal abilities. It means that all animals have an equal right to moral consideration and legal protection. And by "all animals" I mean all sentient beings, every creature who can feel. It's reasonable and right to treat any creature with a nervous system as sentient. Reasonable because of the shared ancestry and physiological similarities of all nervous systems. Reasonable because creatures with a nervous system act as if they feel. Right because we should give the benefit of the doubt when it comes to moral consideration. Because all beings who can feel need protection, all beings who can feel are entitled to rights. The sole criterion for rights should be sentience.

    Leave a comment:


  • maestro8
    replied
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKTsWjbjQ8E&NR=1"]Vegetarians, from the other point of view![/ame]

    Leave a comment:


  • wickedbob
    replied
    Why all the love for fake meat?

    Vegatables are good by themselves. Just learn what you like and how to make it. I eat a bland diet becasue I'm lazy and don't really care that much. I eat for nutrition fisrt, taste later.

    I'm becoming increasingly restrictive with my diet. Cheese and milk are out now, soy milk is in. I don't mind it, it's actually pretty good.

    Just do it smart, and eat whole natural foods found in nature.

    I haven't really missed meat, or crave it. I'm not a vegitarian yet, but I hardly eat meat, and I've been opting for vegitarian options when I do eat out. I mostly eat meat for convience and to be polite.

    Just don't go all out for a week then quit. I've been working on my diet for a couples years now, doing it slow as to make the changers permanent 2-3 years back I litterally eat pizza rolls daily, along with fried cheese sticks and french fries, no lie, and no wonder I felt like a pile of shit. I'd pile on loads and loads of cheese on top of all of that.

    Just make the changes slow and gradual, maybe be like me and cut out red meat first, the eventually white meat and lastly fish. Focus on adding good to your diet more than taking things out. Just add good food, which will sort of push out the bad/unwanted food.
    Last edited by wickedbob; 2010-01-04, 01:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • unibikeling
    replied
    Originally posted by BillyTheMountain View Post
    http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/....oreos.jl.html
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Getting the lard out: The koshering of the Oreo cookie
    By Julia Langer
    Imagine never being able to taste something as common as an Oreo. Or being unsure if a marshmallow were kosher. What does "kosher" even mean?

    Joe Regenstein, professor of food science at Cornell and director of the Cornell Kosher and Halal Food Initiative, discussed these and other food adventures, Feb. 20, in a talk given as part of Cornell's Jewish Faculty Lecture Series.


    Julia Langer
    Professor Joe Regenstein discusses "How the Oreo Became Kosher and Other Jewish Food Adventures," Feb. 20 in Anabel Taylor Hall.

    Speaking in Anabel Taylor Hall's Founders Room, Regenstein told the story of how Nabisco's famous Oreo cookie was converted into a fully orthodox kosher product [in December 1997, according to the Orthodox Union (OU)]. Regenstein served as an informal consultant to get the process started by giving a talk at Nabisco on the koshering process in the mid-1990s.

    The costly transformation took more than three years. "It was probably the most expensive conversion of a company from non-kosher to kosher," Regenstein said. Nabisco owned approximately 100 baking ovens measuring about 300 feet in length, nearly the length of a football field, and all had to be converted to kosher.

    The process began, Regenstein recalled, when many of the country's major ice cream companies, most of them operating under kosher standards, wanted to make a product with authentic Oreos. There was just one problem. Oreos were made with lard. Under the Jewish dietary laws of kosher, pigs, the source of lard, are a forbidden food. Once Nabisco had removed the lard, mainly for health reasons, going kosher became possible.
    billy. i know. i dont eat oreos. i havent had one in about 2 years.

    Leave a comment:


  • Biggestbtc
    replied
    Originally posted by Into the blue View Post
    You went to see Avatar too?
    lol That's what I was thinking too.

    Though I haven't seen it myself...

    Leave a comment:


  • BillyTheMountain
    replied
    http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/....oreos.jl.html
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Getting the lard out: The koshering of the Oreo cookie
    By Julia Langer
    Imagine never being able to taste something as common as an Oreo. Or being unsure if a marshmallow were kosher. What does "kosher" even mean?

    Joe Regenstein, professor of food science at Cornell and director of the Cornell Kosher and Halal Food Initiative, discussed these and other food adventures, Feb. 20, in a talk given as part of Cornell's Jewish Faculty Lecture Series.


    Julia Langer
    Professor Joe Regenstein discusses "How the Oreo Became Kosher and Other Jewish Food Adventures," Feb. 20 in Anabel Taylor Hall.

    Speaking in Anabel Taylor Hall's Founders Room, Regenstein told the story of how Nabisco's famous Oreo cookie was converted into a fully orthodox kosher product [in December 1997, according to the Orthodox Union (OU)]. Regenstein served as an informal consultant to get the process started by giving a talk at Nabisco on the koshering process in the mid-1990s.

    The costly transformation took more than three years. "It was probably the most expensive conversion of a company from non-kosher to kosher," Regenstein said. Nabisco owned approximately 100 baking ovens measuring about 300 feet in length, nearly the length of a football field, and all had to be converted to kosher.

    The process began, Regenstein recalled, when many of the country's major ice cream companies, most of them operating under kosher standards, wanted to make a product with authentic Oreos. There was just one problem. Oreos were made with lard. Under the Jewish dietary laws of kosher, pigs, the source of lard, are a forbidden food. Once Nabisco had removed the lard, mainly for health reasons, going kosher became possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • unibikeling
    replied
    Originally posted by BillyTheMountain View Post
    Graham,

    Some cookies are also made with lard.

    Watch out.

    Billy
    oh billy, you know how much i love eating unlabled mysterious cookies all the time. :P


    Yeah, i barely ever buy and eat stupid convenience foods. Pointless.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X