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Interspirituality: Following more than one sacred path: Judaism, Hinduism,Islam,etc

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  • #31
    Originally posted by monkeyman
    I'm a big believer in there being just one God, and that all religions stem from differet interpretations of that one God
    I'm a big believer in there being just One Wheel!
    One Wheel : bear necessity
    (Abuello RodoMancat)

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    • #32
      Man creates god. An inversion of thought occurs. God creates man. Now living with an impossible and immaterial ideal, man is alienated from god. Man is alienated from himself.

      Interspiritualism is the convienance of culture.

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      • #33
        I would consider myself interspiritual, in my quest of finding truth i have come across many philosophies to live by that i agree with and try to live. I dont fully follow any religion in it's entirety.
        What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you into your loneliest loneliness and say to you: 'This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live once more and innumerable times more' ... AMOR FATI

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        • #34
          Originally posted by BluntRM
          Interspiritualism is the convienance of culture.
          As is everything you do, or choose not to do.

          Why are some of the big social changers interspiritualists? Gandhi, Woody Guthrie, unisteez, etc.
          While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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          • #35
            I remember watching soupy Sales onTV as a kid.
            Mark Twain says that what sets man apart from all the other animals is that he has found the true religion----All 5000 of them.
            I think that what sets man apart from other animals is his ego and that he cooks his food. I've mat a dog or two that had an ego problem but never saw one cook supper.
            I wonder sometimes if God might think more of cockroaches than he does us as he has had longer to perfect a working model.
            Frank Herbert said that the "inevitable fate of all organized religions is the prostitution of the ideals of the prophet they claim to represent".

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            • #36
              Originally posted by tumblebug rollin
              Frank Herbert said that the "inevitable fate of all organized religions is the prostitution of the ideals of the prophet they claim to represent".
              this the fate of any "philosophy on rail" system. a sure recipe for failing is to provide recipes.
              Since we are at quoting SF writers Jack Vance wrote many funny things about that: he is the master of creating cultures that subvert the original intent of their founder
              One Wheel : bear necessity
              (Abuello RodoMancat)

              Comment


              • #37
                Where Angels Fear to Tread by Alex J. Morrey

                God is thought of and experienced as the spirit of Reality where Reality is a non-conflicting logical structure beyond the reality of our world of space and time.

                Where Angels Fear to Tread by Alex J. Morrey shows how the spirit of Reality relates to the gods of the various religions. We as individuals can live in Reality by living in our Real self as an integral part of Reality much as did that controversial historic figure, Jesus of Nazareth, who demonstrated a direct interaction with Reality.

                Have you ever wondered if everything you think you know is really true? Is it possible that there might be a better, more complete understanding of how the world works than what we unthinkingly assume? Do religious leaders and scientists really know what they are talking about?

                If you are seriously prepared to have your assumptions challenged, Where Angels Fear to Tread by Alex J. Morrey is essential reading for you. We assume the universe in which we all live to be a consequence of objective fact. What if, instead, it is a consequence of collective belief? There is no noticeable difference between living in either situation, but it requires a quantum leap in thought to understand the difference and to come to terms with the implications.

                Learn how to examine the truth of human existence, the nature of reality, and the meaning of God from the viewpoint of physics and science. Understand reality/Reality as never before.

                Shake off that complacency and get ready to start thinking in an entirely new and very exciting way! Discover exciting new answers to a range of intriguing old questions.

                Is faster-than-light travel, or time travel possible?
                Are UFOs mere hallucinations or are they real objects?
                Can extra-terrestrial life forms really exist anywhere?
                Are crop circles more than just natural phenomena?
                What is that mysterious ‘Dark Energy’ that fills the universe?
                Why do we perceive objects as solid when in Reality they are not?
                Is God real or imaginary? If so, what does God being real mean?
                What is the root cause of religion, and where does religion fit in?
                Is this life only a dream-like existence?
                Are we each influenced by the values and beliefs of the masses?
                Can we influence our own life events closer to Reality, and if so, how?
                With a degree in physics and mathematics and a revelation from Reality, author Alex Morrey provides answers to these questions in a provocative and powerfully written manner that will broaden every truth seeker’s knowledge and leave readers captivated and greatly enriched.

                Where Angels Fear to Tread by Alex J. Morrey sets out an alternative understanding of what we perceive to be the universe, the world in which we live. Instead of following the current trend of assuming it to be a consequence of objective fact independent of humanity, it is shown how it can be thought of as a consequence of collective belief entirely dependent upon humanity; a ‘dream-like’ world.

                With this alternative way of thinking about space, time and what we perceive to be real, we take a fresh look at the nature of matter, light, the gravitational and electrostatic fields, etc., and why we perceive the speed of light to be about 186,282.4 miles per second. We can even give significance to the so-called Dark Energy that fills the universe. It is shown how humanity itself creates the ultimate Reality beyond space and time. Science is shown to involve studying just one segment (our world) of a very large multi-segment array of ‘dream-like’ worlds.

                In this new way of thinking,
                While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

                Comment


                • #38
                  Both Muslim and Christian

                  Originally posted by BillyTheMountain
                  Why are some of the big social changers interspiritualists? Gandhi, Woody Guthrie, unisteez, etc.
                  "I am both Muslim and Christian"
                  By Janet I. Tu

                  Seattle Times religion reporter

                  STEVE RINGMAN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

                  The Rev. Ann Holmes Redding attends the Sunday morning service at St.
                  Clement's of Rome Episcopal Church in Seattle. Redding has been an
                  Episcopal priest for 20 years and a Muslim for 15 months.

                  Redding, at right, prays with other members of the Al-Islam Center
                  recently at the Yesler Community Center.

                  The Rev. Ann Holmes Redding, right, gets a hug from Ayesha Anderson at
                  the end of a service recently with members of the Al-Islam Center in
                  Seattle. Redding is a Christian who is also a practicing Muslim, and she
                  worships with members of both faiths.

                  Redding talks with 4-year-old Celia Connor before the start of the
                  service at St. Clement's of Rome Episcopal Church in Seattle. On
                  Sundays, Redding often prays at St. Clement's. On Fridays, she prays
                  with the Al-Islam Center.

                  Shortly after noon on Fridays, the Rev. Ann Holmes Redding ties on a
                  black headscarf, preparing to pray with her Muslim group on First Hill.

                  On Sunday mornings, Redding puts on the white collar of an Episcopal
                  priest.

                  She does both, she says, because she's Christian and Muslim.

                  Redding, who until recently was director of faith formation at St.
                  Mark's Episcopal Cathedral, has been a priest for more than 20 years.
                  Now she's ready to tell people that, for the last 15 months, she's also
                  been a Muslim — drawn to the faith after an introduction to Islamic
                  prayers left her profoundly moved.

                  Her announcement has provoked surprise and bewilderment in many,
                  raising an obvious question: How can someone be both a Christian and a
                  Muslim?

                  But it has drawn other reactions too. Friends generally say they
                  support her, while religious scholars are mixed: Some say that,
                  depending on how one interprets the tenets of the two faiths, it is,
                  indeed, possible to be both. Others consider the two faiths mutually
                  exclusive.

                  "There are tenets of the faiths that are very, very different," said
                  Kurt Fredrickson, director of the doctor of ministry program at Fuller
                  Theological Seminary in Pasadena, Calif. "The most basic would be: What
                  do you do with Jesus?"

                  Christianity has historically regarded Jesus as the son of God and God
                  incarnate, both fully human and fully divine. Muslims, though they
                  regard Jesus as a great prophet, do not see him as divine and do not
                  consider him the son of God.

                  "I don't think it's possible" to be both, Fredrickson said, just like
                  "you can't be a Republican and a Democrat."

                  Redding, who will begin teaching the New Testament as a visiting
                  assistant professor at Seattle University this fall, has a different
                  analogy: "I am both Muslim and Christian, just like I'm both an American
                  of African descent and a woman. I'm 100 percent both."

                  Redding doesn't feel she has to resolve all the contradictions. People
                  within one religion can't even agree on all the details, she said. "So
                  why would I spend time to try to reconcile all of Christian belief with
                  all of Islam?

                  "At the most basic level, I understand the two religions to be
                  compatible. That's all I need."

                  She says she felt an inexplicable call to become Muslim, and to
                  surrender to God — the meaning of the word "Islam."

                  "It wasn't about intellect," she said. "All I know is the calling of my
                  heart to Islam was very much something about my identity and who I am
                  supposed to be.

                  "I could not not be a Muslim."

                  Redding's situation is highly unusual. Officials at the national
                  Episcopal Church headquarters said they are not aware of any other
                  instance in which a priest has also been a believer in another faith.
                  They said it's up to the local bishop to decide whether such a priest
                  could continue in that role.

                  Redding's bishop, the Rt. Rev. Vincent Warner, says he accepts Redding
                  as an Episcopal priest and a Muslim, and that he finds the interfaith
                  possibilities exciting. Her announcement, first made through a story in
                  her diocese's newspaper, hasn't caused much controversy yet, he said.

                  Some local Muslim leaders are perplexed.

                  Being both Muslim and Christian — "I don't know how that works," said
                  Hisham Farajallah, president of the Islamic Center of Washington.

                  But Redding has been embraced by leaders at the Al-Islam Center of
                  Seattle, the Muslim group she prays with.

                  "Islam doesn't say if you're a Christian, you're not a Muslim," said
                  programming director Ayesha Anderson. "Islam doesn't lay it out like
                  that."

                  Redding believes telling her story can help ease religious tensions,
                  and she hopes it can be a step toward her dream of creating an institute
                  to study Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

                  "I think this thing that's happened to me can be a sign of hope," she
                  said.

                  Finding a religion that fit

                  Redding is 55 and single, with deep brown eyes, dreadlocks and a voice
                  that becomes easily impassioned when talking about faith. She's also a
                  classically trained singer, and has sung at jazz nights at St. Mark's.

                  The oldest of three girls, Redding grew up in Pennsylvania in a
                  high-achieving, intellectual family. Her father was one of the lawyers
                  who argued the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court case
                  that desegregated the nation's public schools. Her mother was in the
                  first class of Fulbright scholars.

                  Though her parents weren't particularly religious, they had her
                  baptized and sent her to an Episcopal Sunday school. She has always
                  sensed that God existed and God loved her, even when things got bleak
                  — which they did.

                  She experienced racism in schools, was sexually abused and, by the time
                  she was a young adult, was struggling with alcohol addiction; she's been
                  in recovery for 20 years.

                  Despite those difficulties, she graduated from Brown University, earned
                  master's degrees from two seminaries and received her Ph.D. in New
                  Testament from Union Theological Seminary in New York City. She felt
                  called to the priesthood and was ordained in 1984.

                  As much as she loves her church, she has always challenged it. She
                  calls Christianity the "world religion of privilege." She has never
                  believed in original sin. And for years she struggled with the nature of
                  Jesus' divinity.

                  She found a good fit at St. Mark's, coming to the flagship of the
                  Episcopal Church in Western Washington in 2001. She was in charge of
                  programs to form and deepen people's faith until March this year when
                  she was one of three employees laid off for budget reasons. The dean of
                  the cathedral said Redding's exploration of Islam had nothing to do with
                  her layoff.

                  Ironically, it was at St. Mark's that she first became drawn to Islam.

                  In fall 2005, a local Muslim leader gave a talk at the cathedral, then
                  prayed before those attending. Redding was moved. As he dropped to his
                  knees and stretched forward against the floor, it seemed to her that his
                  whole body was involved in surrendering to God.

                  Then in the spring, at a St. Mark's interfaith class, another Muslim
                  leader taught a chanted prayer and led a meditation on opening one's
                  heart. The chanting appealed to the singer in Redding; the meditation
                  spoke to her heart. She began saying the prayer daily.

                  Around that time, her mother died, and then "I was in a situation that
                  I could not handle by any other means, other than a total surrender to
                  God," she said.

                  She still doesn't know why that meant she had to become a Muslim. All
                  she knows is "when God gives you an invitation, you don't turn it
                  down."

                  In March 2006, she said her shahada — the profession of faith —
                  testifying that there is only one God and that Mohammed is his
                  messenger. She became a Muslim.

                  Before she took the shahada, she read a lot about Islam. Afterward, she
                  learned from local Muslim leaders, including those in Islam's largest
                  denomination — Sunni — and those in the Sufi mystical tradition of
                  Islam. She began praying with the Al-Islam Center, a Sunni group that is
                  predominantly African-American.

                  There were moments when practicing Islam seemed like coming home.

                  In Seattle's Episcopal circles, Redding had mixed largely with white
                  people. "To walk into Al-Islam and be reminded that there are more
                  people of color in the world than white people, that in itself is a
                  relief," she said.

                  She found the discipline of praying five times a day — one of the
                  five pillars of Islam that all Muslims are supposed to follow — gave
                  her the deep sense of connection with God that she yearned for.

                  It came from "knowing at all times I'm in between prayers." She likens
                  it to being in love, constantly looking forward to having "all these
                  dates with God. ... Living a life where you're remembering God
                  intentionally, consciously, just changes everything."

                  Friends who didn't know she was practicing Islam told her she glowed.

                  Aside from the established sets of prayers she recites in Arabic fives
                  times each day, Redding says her prayers are neither uniquely Islamic
                  nor Christian. They're simply her private talks with God or Allah —
                  she uses both names interchangeably. "It's the same person, praying to
                  the same God."

                  In many ways, she says, "coming to Islam was like coming into a family
                  with whom I'd been estranged. We have not only the same God, but the
                  same ancestor with Abraham."

                  A shared beginning

                  Indeed, Islam, Christianity and Judaism trace their roots to Abraham,
                  the patriarch of Judaism who is also considered the spiritual father of
                  all three faiths. They share a common belief in one God, and there are
                  certain similar stories in their holy texts.

                  But there are many significant differences, too.

                  Muslims regard the Quran as the unadulterated word of God, delivered
                  through the angel Gabriel to Mohammed. While they believe the Torah and
                  the Gospels include revelations from God, they believe those revelations
                  have been misinterpreted or mishandled by humans.

                  Most significantly, Muslims and Christians disagree over the divinity
                  of Jesus.

                  Muslims generally believe in Jesus' virgin birth, that he was a
                  messenger of God, that he ascended to heaven alive and that he will come
                  back at the end of time to destroy evil. They do not believe in the
                  Trinity, in the divinity of Jesus or in his death and resurrection.

                  For Christians, belief in Jesus' divinity, and that he died on the
                  cross and was resurrected, lie at the heart of the faith, as does the
                  belief that there is one God who consists of the Father, Son and Holy
                  Spirit.

                  Redding's views, even before she embraced Islam, were more interpretive
                  than literal.

                  She believes the Trinity is an idea about God and cannot be taken
                  literally.

                  She does not believe Jesus and God are the same, but rather that God is
                  more than Jesus.

                  She believes Jesus is the son of God insofar as all humans are the
                  children of God, and that Jesus is divine, just as all humans are divine
                  — because God dwells in all humans.

                  What makes Jesus unique, she believes, is that out of all humans, he
                  most embodied being filled with God and identifying completely with
                  God's will.

                  She does believe that Jesus died on the cross and was resurrected, and
                  acknowledges those beliefs conflict with the teachings of the Quran.
                  "That's something I'll find a challenge the rest of my life," she said.

                  She considers Jesus her savior. At times of despair, because she knows
                  Jesus suffered and overcame suffering, "he has connected me with God,"
                  she said.

                  That's not to say she couldn't develop as deep a relationship with
                  Mohammed. "I'm still getting to know him," she said.

                  Matter of interpretation

                  Some religious scholars understand Redding's thinking.

                  While the popular Christian view is that Jesus is God and that he came
                  to Earth and took on a human body, other Christians believe his divinity
                  means that he embodied the spirit of God in his life and work, said
                  Eugene Webb, professor emeritus of comparative religion at the
                  University of Washington.

                  Webb says it's possible to be both Muslim and Christian: "It's a matter
                  of interpretation. But a lot of people on both sides do not believe in
                  interpretation. "

                  Ihsan Bagby, associate professor of Islamic studies at the University
                  of Kentucky, agrees with Webb, and adds that Islam tends to be a little
                  more flexible. Muslims can have faith in Jesus, he said, as long as they
                  believe in Mohammed's message.
                  While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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                  • #39
                    the article says Islam has no problems with people being BOTH Muslim and Christian

                    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...edding17m.html
                    While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by oldgeezers940
                      I've always been confused as to why I'm constantly being told Muhammad was a false prophet. I don't doubt monotheism too much, it just seems to me that Judaism, Islam, and Christianity all have something to offer.
                      .
                      While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        haha, that was a surprise to see myself quoted down here.

                        But I have a question, anyone here consider themselves simply abrahamitic?

                        Not that I consider myself that, it just seems that maybe going back to the source of 3 paths would be something a fair amount of people would consider.
                        Myspace
                        SAY WHAA?!?!

                        <>< Unicycle For Christ <><

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                        • #42
                          I'm sure there are.
                          While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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                          • #43
                            I think my philosophy on life probably has ideas that are shared with various religions, so in that sense I am interspiritual. But really, you can't be all religions at once.
                            http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=peleproductions
                            Unicycle for rational thought, open mindedness, and uncertainty. And Spencer.

                            Inventor of the Slapflip.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by peleschramm View Post
                              I think my philosophy on life probably has ideas that are shared with various religions, so in that sense I am interspiritual. But really, you can't be all religions at once.
                              Riiiggght! And an atomic particle cannot be in two places at once.

                              The 21st century is waiting for you, Pele!
                              While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by oldgeezers940 View Post
                                haha, that was a surprise to see myself quoted down here.

                                But I have a question, anyone here consider themselves simply abrahamitic?

                                Not that I consider myself that, it just seems that maybe going back to the source of 3 paths would be something a fair amount of people would consider.
                                It's appealing, but why limit myself?
                                While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

                                Comment

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