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Interspirituality: Following more than one sacred path: Judaism, Hinduism,Islam,etc

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  • #16
    Originally posted by wobbling bear
    in another thread I described myself as a "sufi atheist"
    There was a great kids show on TV here in America in the late 60s/early 70s. The host's name was Sufi Sales. It was a favorite of mine.
    Last edited by JJuggle; 2006-04-13, 04:19 PM.
    Raphael Lasar

    To Plotz is Human
    To Shvitz Divine

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    • #17
      Originally posted by BillyTheMountain
      seemingly contradictory truth sets simultaneously--That's one angle. Another is that one may move freely from one spiritual universe to another, just as one may move from nation to nation. Each nation has it's own rules, cultural perspective and language. Still, few of us say the French language and cultural contradicts the English culture and language. You simply recognize you've moved into another different area.
      Why would you want/do this?

      Cathy
      Cathy

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      • #18
        Originally posted by hell-on-wheel
        There are people today who consider themselves Jewish Christians - who see Christianity as a subsect of their Jewish faith, but they aren't really recognized by other Jews. Of course, most non-Jewish Christians heartily welcome Jewish Christians because they see it as vindication of the origins of their faith. They don't mind if they call themselves Jewish first and Christian second, if they call their places of worship synagogs and don't celebrate Christmas the same way. Hmm...sarting to sound more like politics than religion.
        "heartily welcome"--excellent phrase. Lex Hixon's book: The Heart of the Qu'ran. So much of what passes for a specific religion isn't, because the heart has been removed. Once you cut out the heart of a human, you can't really prance what remains out as a human. Same with any religion.

        Reza Aslan, author of No God But God, says: Religion...is not faith.
        [It] is an institutionalized system of symbols and metaphors (Rituals
        and myths) that provide a common language with which a community of
        faith can share with each other their NUMINOUS encounter with the Divine
        Presence. ....The clash of monotheism occurs when faith, which is
        mysterious and ineffable and which eschews all categorizations, becomes
        entangled in the gnarled branches of religion.

        I know BuJews, HinJews, SuJews or JewFi (Muslim), and multiple other combinations, so obviously, anyone can be anything, despite what any religious "authority" tries to legislate.
        While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JJuggle
          The host's name was Sufi Sales. It was a favorite of mine.
          I can't see how firmly your tongue is implanted in your cheek...any relation to Soupy Sales?

          Back on topic: When someone says they are "Spiritual" but not necessarily "Religious", does that imply they do believe in some type of supernatural realm?
          Last edited by UniBrier; 2006-04-13, 04:56 PM.
          Steve

          Hop Drop & Roll

          “If something is too hard to do, then it's not worth doing. You just stick that guitar in the closet next to your
          shortwave radio, your karate outfit and your unicycle and we'll go inside and watch TV.” – Homer

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          • #20
            Originally posted by UniBrier
            When someone says they are "Spiritual" but not necessarily "Religious", does that imply they do believe in some type of supernatural realm?
            People mean all knids of things whenever they talk religion or spirituality. In fact, no 2 Christians have exactly the same faith, belief or religion, no 2 have accepted Christ as their personal savior in the same way, and no 2 people know GOD in the same way. No 2 people know me in the same way either. Hmmm.

            I recommend you ask anyone who says that, if you're truly interested.
            While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by UniBrier
              any relation to Soupy Sales?
              Never heard of him.

              Back on topic: When someone says they are "Spiritual" but not necessarily "Religious", does that imply they do believe in some type of supernatural realm?
              No, it does not.
              Raphael Lasar

              To Plotz is Human
              To Shvitz Divine

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by BillyTheMountain
                Reza Aslan, author of No God But God, says: Religion...is not faith.
                [It] is an institutionalized system of symbols and metaphors (Rituals
                and myths) that provide a common language with which a community of
                faith can share with each other their NUMINOUS encounter with the Divine
                Presence. ....The clash of monotheism occurs when faith, which is
                mysterious and ineffable and which eschews all categorizations, becomes
                entangled in the gnarled branches of religion.
                I can definately dig that. By Aslan's definition, religion is what I escaped from in the Southern Baptist tradition (though they may have had little faith), and a community of faith is what I found in the Society of Friends (though they may have a little religion). The Quakers, by the nature of their simplicity, strive to strip away the rituals and myths that so often act as stumbling blocks along one's spiritual journey.

                Of course, I think that rituals and metaphors can also be incredibly helpful along the path, provided we grant them their proper context:
                Originally posted by podzol
                The whole evolution debate wouldn't arrise if people would try to be less absolutist in their notion of truth. Science offers measurable truths, religion offers spiritual truths. Both are truths. Comparisons between them are just silly.
                Well said. My favorite book of the Bible is Jonah. I believe the Book of Jonah is 100% Truth. That statement has nothing to do with whether at some point in temporal time and space, a man was swallowed by a "great fish" and spat upon the land.

                And with that, I'm going unicycling! This is my last post to this and other religious/spiritual/faith threads, I promise!
                "...or the confluence of rare meteorological phenomena."
                -George Peck

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by hell-on-wheel
                  I can definately dig that. By Aslan's definition, religion is what I escaped from in the Southern Baptist tradition (though they may have had little faith), and a community of faith is what I found in the Society of Friends (though they may have a little religion). The Quakers, by the nature of their simplicity, strive to strip away the rituals and myths that so often act as stumbling blocks along one's spiritual journey.
                  Amazing how geography contributes to one's intetspiritual choices, isn't it?

                  In NYC we have it all, and numerous Sufi Orders, Hindu Orders, Buddhist Orders. If you try a couple of each, it's hard not to find something you like.
                  While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by BillyTheMountain
                    In NYC we have it all, and numerous Sufi Orders, Hindu Orders, Buddhist Orders. If you try a couple of each, it's hard not to find something you like.
                    Just like Americans, New Yorkers no less, to go religion shopping.

                    I myself am a Unitarian Universalist, which as anyone who knows knows, is like the Mall of America for religion.
                    Last edited by JJuggle; 2006-04-14, 05:34 PM.
                    Raphael Lasar

                    To Plotz is Human
                    To Shvitz Divine

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by JJuggle
                      I myself am a Unitarian Universalist, which as anyone who knows knows, is like the Mall of America for religion.
                      In what way?
                      While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by BillyTheMountain
                        In what way?
                        I was being somewhat tongue in cheek and given your general knowledge of religion, I suspect you get the joke. Anyway, I feel like yours is a trick question.
                        Raphael Lasar

                        To Plotz is Human
                        To Shvitz Divine

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by JJuggle
                          I was being somewhat tongue in cheek and given your general knowledge of religion, I suspect you get the joke. Anyway, I feel like yours is a trick question.

                          Sincerely. Many regard the Mall of America as a nightmare, representing the worst of American values.

                          I don't know anyone who views your church in a negative light, in any way. From what I know, it's members tend to be more progressive than those who go to the Mall.

                          Help me.
                          While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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                          • #28
                            I'm a big believer in there being just one God, and that all religions stem from differet interpretations of that one God
                            ~Alex Brown
                            Keep your laws off my body, out of my wallet, and away from my bedroom.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by monkeyman
                              I'm a big believer in there being just one God, and that all religions stem from differet interpretations of that one God
                              This was a week for interspiritualists.

                              Muhammed's (PBUH) birthday was on Monday.

                              We had a second Seder for Pessach on Thursday. A particular interspiritualist might have thought, hey, it's Holy Thursday, the same day Jesus and his Apostles had their Passover Seder, aka the Last Supper, the day before Good Friday.

                              And while unicycling today, I stopped at a hotdog stand, and with reverence to the Hindus and Buddhists, I ordered ONE WITH EVERYTHING!

                              Peace, Billy
                              While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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                              • #30
                                Gandhi was an interspiritualist, too!!

                                Today we need the real Gandhi, the courageous and ever-growing seeker after truth.

                                In the 1920s he described himself as a fundamentalist Hindu. But then for the sake of unity with other religionists, he declared that he was also in some sense a Moslem, a Jew, a Christian, a Sikh, a Buddhist, a Zoroastrian, and so on; and to demonstrate this feeling of unity he evolved sarva dharma prarthana ("all-religious prayer"), taking passages from all religious scriptures. Finally, in 1946, he went further, as he came to appreciate Gora's moral stature and began to understand his atheism. When Gora said to him: "If truth is god, then why don't you say 'satyam' [truth] instead of 'Raghupati Raghava' [almighty Lord]? 'Raghupati Raghava' conveys to others a meaning very different from what it conveys to you," Gandhi replied, "Do you think I am superstitious? I am super-atheist!"[1] [return to "Gandhi's Last Words"]

                                It is well known that after saying for years that "God is Truth," Gandhi became dissatisfied with this motto and changed it to "Truth is God." It is less well known that the communal riots and religiously inspired mass killings which took place toward the end of his life drove him to remark (to Pandit Sundarlal) that he wished the communities would turn atheist if that would serve to stop communal hatred and riots,[2] and that he embarked on his last fast "in the name of Truth whose familiar name is God," and at the end of it remarked that:

                                In the name of God we have indulged in lies, massacres of people, without caring whether they were innocent or guilty, men or women, children or infants… [but] I am not aware if anybody has done these things in the name of Truth. With the same name on my lips I have broken the fast.[3
                                While you and I are having our cake-and-ice-cream party, the others are having a drink-the-blood-of-the-poor party in the back room. --[QUOTE=maestro8;1433130]

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