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2020 - I might do a welding course

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  • Gockie
    replied
    Originally posted by slamdance View Post
    Ankle injury?
    From my experience that happens when your feet "gets stuck" onto the pedal.
    The culprit are spikes or features on the pedal.
    If you are recovering from injury and "worried" about more "sticking" you should switch back to "smooth" pedals.
    Just be careful when things get wet.
    Ride on.
    It was a bad dismount off the giraffe, Just when my feet hit the ground, I realised my left foot landed more on it’s side than it’s bottom.
    Nothing to do with the pedals.

    Leave a comment:


  • slamdance
    replied
    Ankle injury?
    From my experience that happens when your feet "gets stuck" onto the pedal.
    The culprit are spikes or features on the pedal.
    If you are recovering from injury and "worried" about more "sticking" you should switch back to "smooth" pedals.
    Just be careful when things get wet.
    Ride on.
    Last edited by slamdance; 2020-03-28, 06:29 PM. Reason: ...

    Leave a comment:


  • Gockie
    replied
    Originally posted by DrD View Post
    Sorry to hear that, I hope you get more mobile soon. It sounds like the sort of thing that will take a while to get back to normal and you seem to have a lot of activities which will be curtailed.... Hopefully you can pick up on the classes next time round though.

    I bought Five-Ten Impact High boots a while back to get ankle support for such things, I don't wear them all that often though, basically because they are a bit of a pain to put on. I was looking at them last night actually, your mishap might change my mind about wearing them....
    Thanks.
    I was having such a good night at unicycling practise too.
    Anyway, this helps me appreciate what difficulties people encounter when they can't use 1 of their feet.

    Leave a comment:


  • DrD
    replied
    Sorry to hear that, I hope you get more mobile soon. It sounds like the sort of thing that will take a while to get back to normal and you seem to have a lot of activities which will be curtailed.... Hopefully you can pick up on the classes next time round though.

    I bought Five-Ten Impact High boots a while back to get ankle support for such things, I don't wear them all that often though, basically because they are a bit of a pain to put on. I was looking at them last night actually, your mishap might change my mind about wearing them....

    Leave a comment:


  • Gockie
    replied
    Well, on Friday night after work I was riding my 5" Giraffe and I tried to dismount off the back. But.... I did a bad dismount and rolled my left ankle. I thought, ok. Next morning my foot was huge and I couldn't put any pressure on it. I ended up going to emergency at my local Hospital and later that day I ended up being operated on. A very memorable Feb 29. Yippee!

    Apparently the ligament made its way into the joint that opened up and so surgery fixed everything up. My shoes weren't particularly good for unicycling. (Mary Jane shoes).

    So.... I'm wearing a moon boot. I can't go to welding class now. I have to defer classes.

    Along with welding, I also can't unicycle, walk, do aerial tissue, canyon, help at my local theatre, play volleyball...

    I can work from bed though with my leg up. I'm spending a lot of time on calls anyway this week.

    I'm going to give up the giraffe.
    Last edited by Gockie; 2020-03-03, 08:26 AM.

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  • Gockie
    replied
    Stick welding week 2, 3 passes of beads run (hope that makes sense)

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...7&id=617795856
    Last edited by Gockie; 2020-02-18, 10:13 AM.

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  • OneTrackMind
    replied
    Originally posted by Gockie View Post
    So playing it back, can I confirm you are saying I should also be turning the rod 90 degrees the whole time while I'm going down along the metal constantly?
    Maintain the same angle with the rod and stay in line with the direction you are moving. Just move the tip of the rod in a tiny bit back and forth sideways working along the leading edge of the puddle.

    When you are just laying down a bead and not really joining anything, the area impinged by the arc might be as wide as the puddle so the sideways movement is virtually not there.

    It becomes more obvious with a larger puddle where you need to move the arc back and forth sideways so you are melting a wider run. The little semicircles follow the edge of the puddle. You have probably seen them in a finished weld where the puddle advanced with each semicircle.

    Imagine joining two big fat pieces of metal. To get good penetration you grind a vee most of the way to the other side along the join. The two pieces only touch for the depth the arc can penetrate. After melting this you move the arc to one side and melt that into the puddle then to the other and melt that. All the while the rod is melting and filling up the vee.

    Later in you course they will explain this which is known as weaving.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gockie
    replied
    Originally posted by OneTrackMind View Post
    That should have been covered before you struck your first arc.
    It was, twist your rod 90 degrees to unstick it. But I wasnt sure why the 90 degree turn was needed

    Originally posted by OneTrackMind View Post
    It is pretty hard to tell exactly what you ran and what was already there. I assume yours are the shiny looking ones. Not bad for a first go and some parts were better than others so I guess you were improving.

    I'd say you probably need to go a bit slower to get more heat into the work as the bead is sitting up from the surface. Possibly a little bit more current too. It is a bit hard to tell looking at a 2D image.

    Beginners often get impatient and move too fast on autopilot instead of focusing on what is happening at the edge the puddle. It is all about the puddle.

    Let the arc melt into the work piece and form a puddle that penetrates well into the surface before you start moving off. Then make sure the edge you are working into is melting and joining the puddle not just melting the rod onto the surface. The bead should flow tangentially into the surface with a concave radius rather than sit out perpendicular.

    If the bead is undercutting the material then the current is too high but you are not likely to get this happen just laying a bead on a flat surface.

    It is hard until you get the fine motor skill to control the tip precisely while maintaining the right arc length but eat into the work piece at the edge of the puddle by moving the rod tip in little semicircles. The puddle is round and you follow its edge fairly precisely without missing melting any of the metal.

    The puddle also needs to be big enough and stay molten long enough for the slag to float to the surface otherwise you get flux inclusions. The depth of penetration and the width are related. A thin bead is a shallow bead.

    Listen to the arc. You can tell a lot about what is going on by the sound. It sounds different when the arc is connecting to already molten metal. It gets unstable when the arc is too long. I've even welded in inaccessible places where I couldn't see what I was doing by guiding the rod using the corner that was being joined and listening to the sound. I wouldn't say it was great join but it was good enough for purpose and saved hours of work removing the tray from the truck to repair it.

    I quite liked the old choke welders with the magnetic shunt current control that rattled and hummed. You could tell when it was going to be a good weld because the hum was steady with strong a fundamental tone.
    Thankyou so much. You make so much sense in this post.
    So playing it back, can I confirm you are saying I should also be turning the rod 90 degrees the whole time while I'm going down along the metal constantly?

    At the end of the class the teacher came into my bay and he helped me, I could really feel my rod tip going deeper, not just the surface but really into the base metal block and really staying in the puddle. He had technical equipment issues to sort out for other students a long time during the class (I suppose some machines hadn't been used for that purpose for a while) so he said he couldn't see how everybody was going along as much as he would have liked to.

    Leave a comment:


  • OneTrackMind
    replied
    Originally posted by Gockie View Post
    I had no other idea of how to unstick the rod,
    That should have been covered before you struck your first arc.

    Leave a comment:


  • OneTrackMind
    replied
    Originally posted by Gockie View Post
    Here's a sample. (Hope you can see it). Stick welding MMA (Manual metal arc)

    https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbi...&ref=bookmarks

    Other than that, any comments?
    It is pretty hard to tell exactly what you ran and what was already there. I assume yours are the shiny looking ones. Not bad for a first go and some parts were better than others so I guess you were improving.

    I'd say you probably need to go a bit slower to get more heat into the work as the bead is sitting up from the surface. Possibly a little bit more current too. It is a bit hard to tell looking at a 2D image.

    Beginners often get impatient and move too fast on autopilot instead of focusing on what is happening at the edge the puddle. It is all about the puddle.

    Let the arc melt into the work piece and form a puddle that penetrates well into the surface before you start moving off. Then make sure the edge you are working into is melting and joining the puddle not just melting the rod onto the surface. The bead should flow tangentially into the surface with a concave radius rather than sit out perpendicular.

    If the bead is undercutting the material then the current is too high but you are not likely to get this happen just laying a bead on a flat surface.

    It is hard until you get the fine motor skill to control the tip precisely while maintaining the right arc length but eat into the work piece at the edge of the puddle by moving the rod tip in little semicircles. The puddle is round and you follow its edge fairly precisely without missing melting any of the metal.

    The puddle also needs to be big enough and stay molten long enough for the slag to float to the surface otherwise you get flux inclusions. The depth of penetration and the width are related. A thin bead is a shallow bead.

    Listen to the arc. You can tell a lot about what is going on by the sound. It sounds different when the arc is connecting to already molten metal. It gets unstable when the arc is too long. I've even welded in inaccessible places where I couldn't see what I was doing by guiding the rod using the corner that was being joined and listening to the sound. I wouldn't say it was great join but it was good enough for purpose and saved hours of work removing the tray from the truck to repair it.

    I quite liked the old choke welders with the magnetic shunt current control that rattled and hummed. You could tell when it was going to be a good weld because the hum was steady with strong a fundamental tone.
    Last edited by OneTrackMind; 2020-02-12, 11:27 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gockie
    replied
    Originally posted by OneTrackMind View Post
    The arc is about 3000 degrees or more. The puddle is about 1500 degrees. (Celsius) The whole job gets hot pretty quickly.



    Depending on the welder technology, during the short circuit the current is quite high. Not a good idea to flick the power switch at this point.

    There is a risk of shock. The open circuit voltage is usually about 80 volts. The operator is usually sweaty so has low skin resistance.
    When I had no other idea of how to unstick the rod, I ended up standing away from it all and turned the machine off at the wall, I believe there’s a circuit breaker there.
    (I wasn’t even sure what dial on the machine turns it off!)

    With the heat, I most certainly could feel it even come through my overalls.

    Anyway, no injuries, just happiness

    Leave a comment:


  • OneTrackMind
    replied
    Originally posted by Gockie View Post
    3 . I had no idea the metal would get so hot. Even with thick leather gloves on, I could feel the heat through the gloves.
    The arc is about 3000 degrees or more. The puddle is about 1500 degrees. (Celsius) The whole job gets hot pretty quickly.

    4. Getting the second stick stuck on the metal was a worry! It wouldn't came off, and then I was thinking, heck, what can I do? (I'm afraid of being electrocuted or everything overheating!) Eventually I switched the machine off, then consulted with another student on what to do and he said to twist the rod if it gets stuck. No more stuck rods.
    Depending on the welder technology, during the short circuit the current is quite high. Not a good idea to flick the power switch at this point.

    There is a risk of shock. The open circuit voltage is usually about 80 volts. The operator is usually sweaty so has low skin resistance.

    Leave a comment:


  • DrD
    replied
    Yes, things get hot. I learned that at around eight years old when I picked up something my father had just been welding (bare hands of course), that is the fairly direct way of learning than kind of sticks with you through life...

    There shouldn't be much risk of electrocution with a stuck rod, overheating is a reasonable risk, if you leave it too long you can get the whole rod red hot, which is not good.

    Twisting the rod to get it off it is stuck is the way to do it, just watch you don't chip off a lot of the flux from the end of the rod. If you do you probably should go and burn the end off until you get back to a non-chipped end (just arc it onto somewhere to burn it off, this is one reason why earth clamps get covered in weld...)

    Leave a comment:


  • Gockie
    replied
    Did our first welding tonight! 7 weeks to go. First week was all about safety, tonight we got to do something!

    Here's a sample. (Hope you can see it). Stick welding MMA (Manual metal arc)

    https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbi...&ref=bookmarks

    A couple of comments
    1. Table is dirty!
    2. The metal was lumpy to begin with (it was used by another student before to put 2 pieces together)
    3 . I had no idea the metal would get so hot. Even with thick leather gloves on, I could feel the heat through the gloves.
    4. Getting the second stick stuck on the metal was a worry! It wouldn't came off, and then I was thinking, heck, what can I do? (I'm afraid of being electrocuted or everything overheating!) Eventually I switched the machine off, then consulted with another student on what to do and he said to twist the rod if it gets stuck. No more stuck rods.

    Other than that, any comments?
    Last edited by Gockie; 2020-02-11, 10:44 AM.

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  • BHChieftain
    replied
    GockieUniHandleBar_dot_com

    Coming to a computer near you?

    Chief
    Last edited by BHChieftain; 2020-02-02, 04:32 PM.

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